Epaminondas Graphed

For the Artificial Intelligence known as the History Machine, sometimes the statistics can get lost in translation, so we have created a visual graph of what a commander looks like. The scale goes from 0 to 10, where 10 is a perfect score and 0 being an absolute catastrophic failure (which is almost impossible). An average commander will score a 5 in all categories. 


History Machine Graphed: 

EpaminondasWin Record: 10/10

With only has a few battles in the database, here you can see a common issue for some: a small, but perfect record. Epaminondas died from his wounds after his last battle but still won. Undeniably an excellent commander, and the History Machine thinks so as well: 10/10. 

Winning Against The Odds: 9/10

This is an unbelievably high score, and the best one we see from any Greek. He had the hard task of ending Spartan military dominance and successfully executed it. Sparta would never recover from his actions. We really see a real genius in action, one that even his contemporaries believed was peerless. A stunning score of 9/10. 

Saving His Men: 5/10

Epaminondas only comes up average here with a 5/10, the History Machine believes his men suffered slightly more than average in terms of casualties. 

Killing the Enemy: 6/10

A 6/10, a great score and a good example of how well Epaminondas could find himself the underdog in numbers but still manage to snatch a victory. 

Killing the Enemy Leader: 10/10

With the goal to cut off the head of the Spartan snake, here we see an incredible 10/10 (rounded up slightly). He is the first commander to kill a Spartan king since the Persians at Thermopylae, and the only commander to manage Spartan regicide ever with a smaller army. The History Machine believes that he is at the peak of destroying enemy leadership. 

Survive a Battle: 5/10 

Having died from his wounds from the battle of Mantinea, here we see a live fast die young score of 5/10. Even with a few average scores included, Epaminondas is thought to be a truly great commander by the History Machine AI.


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